Harshal Chaudhari

I'm a PhD student with Department of Computer Science at Boston University. I'm co-advised by Prof. John Byers and Prof. Evimaria Terzi. I received my Bachelor's in Computer Science from BITS Pilani, India in 2013 and my Master's in Computer Science from Boston University in 2015. My research interests include algorithmic aspects of data mining alongwith electronic commerce, web and data analytics.

Some of my hobbies include graphite and color pencil portraiture as well as playing guitar. Feel free to look at some of my artworks on my blog. I'm an avid technology enthusiast and am always upto date with the events in the tech world, especially Android. I'm a passionate follower of Formula One, though on the ironic side, I couldn't drive a car if my life depended on it !


Latest News

May 20, 2018: Excited to spend my summer at Zillow Group as an AI intern on the Personalization team. Transition from a grad lab where the window faces another brick wall to a 40th floor office with a 360 degree view of Seattle is quite enjoyable!

February 20, 2018: Our paper "Putting Data in the Driver's Seat: Optimizing Earnings for On-Demand Ride-Hailing" featured on The Morning Paper.

December 19, 2017: Our paper "Markov Chain Monitoring" accepted at SIAM International Conference on Data Mining (SDM18), San Diego.

December 19, 2017: Our paper "Impact of free app promotion on future sales" accepted at TSMO 2018: Workshop on Two-sided Marketplace Optimization: Search, Pricing, Matching & Growth.

October 23, 2017: Our paper "Putting Data in the Driver's Seat: Optimizing Earnings for On-Demand Ride-Hailing" accepted at WSDM 2018, Los Angeles.

August 13-17, 2017: Excited to be at KDD 2017, Halifax, Nova Scotia on a Student Travel Award.

July 13, 2017: Presented our work on "Impact of free app promotion on future sales" at Platform Strategy Research Symposium.

March 3, 2017: Our work on "Impact of free app promotion on future sales" presented at 2017 Winter Conference on Business Analytics (WCBA) by my advisor, Prof. John Byers.


"I decry the current tendency to seek patents on the algorithms. There are better ways to earn a living than to prevent other people from making use of one's contributions to computer science."

Donald Knuth